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New insights into side effects can help prostate cancer patients choose treatments
In the Journal of the American Medical Association, a study led by UNC Lineberger member Ronald C. Chen, MD, MPH, examines quality-of-life outcomes for modern treatment choices most patients will face, including active surveillance, radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation treatment, and brachytherapy.
Located in News
Researchers map genetic changes in glioblastoma as it progresses, test potential treatment strategy
In a pair of preclinical studies published in the journal Neuro-Oncology, UNC Lineberger's C. Ryan Miller, MD, PhD, and the Phoenix-based Translational Genomics Research Institute report on the genetic evolution of glioblastoma as it progresses in severity and a potential strategy to treat this often fast-growing brain cancer type.
Located in News
In ovarian cancer, researchers uncover new drivers of cell division
UNC Lineberger's Michael J. Emanuele, PhD, and colleagues have identified a key activator that can turn on FoxM1, a protein that drives expression of genes that help cells replicate and divide, a finding they published in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology. They also discovered, paradoxically, that the activator for FoxM1 is also responsible for turning this protein off.
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Genetic alterations more common in tumors of older patients with metastatic breast cancer
In preliminary findings presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, researchers showed that older patients were as likely as younger patients to receive targeted therapy and enroll in therapeutic trials based on their sequencing results.
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UNC Lineberger researchers to study prostate cancer treatment side effects, survival outcomes
The use of robot-assisted surgery and modern radiation techniques have been rapidly adopted as treatments for prostate cancer, but a UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher is asking what the newer technologies will mean in terms of side effects and outcomes for patients in the long-term.
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Insurance, distance to care can be barriers to breast reconstruction
Researchers say breast reconstruction can help with self-esteem, sexuality and body image after cancer treatment. But a UNC Lineberger study led by Michelle Roughton, MD, has found that the type of insurance a woman has as well as distance to a plastic surgeon's office can be barriers to the procedure.
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New UNC Lineberger faculty recruited to launch T-cell cancer therapy trials
Two new faculty members have joined the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center to help launch groundbreaking immunotherapy clinical trials that will test an experimental treatment in which patients’ own immune cells are genetically engineered to fight their cancer.
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Cancer cells continue abnormal growth by activating error-prone DNA synthesis
UNC Lineberger researchers led by Cyrus Vaziri, PhD, describe the discovery of how a specific cellular protein present in cancer cells triggers a repair mechanism that allows them to DNA damage tolerance and abnormal growth.
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Researchers use genetics to probe immune system’s role in fighting cancer
Findings published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute show that immune cells do not respond the same way to all tumor types. The study, led by UNC Lineberger researcher Benjamin Vincent, MD, could lay the foundation for the discovery of biomarkers to determine which patients might respond to certain immune-stimulating cancer treatments.
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UNC Lineberger launches innovative cellular immunotherapy program
UNC Lineberger, with its U.S. FDA-approved Good Manufacturing Practices, or “clean,” facility, is one of only a select academic centers in the United States with the capability to genetically modify patient immune cells for clinical use. This makes it possible for people who live in the Southeastern U.S. to stay closer to home to undergo cellular immunotherapy treatment.
Located in News