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A BRAIN Initiative first: new tool can switch behavior ‘on’ and ‘off’
Using a new ‘chemogenetic’ technique invented at UNC, scientists turn neurons ‘on’ and ‘off’ to demonstrate how brain circuits control behavior in mice. This unique tool – the first to result from the NIH BRAIN Initiative – will help scientists understand how to modulate neurons to more effectively treat diseases.
Located in News
Providing hope and healing through health
Even in the midst of treatment, many cancer patients are finding that exercise helps them to feel better, both physically and emotionally. Through the Get Real & Heal program, UNC researchers are digging deeper into the science behind why moving more can make a positive impact on patients' overall health and well-being.
Located in News
Hyman Muss
MD, School of Medicine, UNC-Chapel Hill, Breast Cancer, Geriatric Oncology Program
Located in People
Exercise, even mild physical activity, may reduce breast cancer risk
A new analysis done by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers has found that physical activity - either mild or intense and before or after menopause - may reduce breast cancer risk, but substantial weight gain may negate these benefits.
Located in News / 2012 News
Lisa A. Carey
MD, Professor, UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC Breast Center, Breast Cancer, Clinical Research
Located in People
Parise and Leisner research into protein CIB1 profiled in Raleigh News and Observer
The Raleigh News and Observer interviewed Leslie Parise, PhD, professor and chair of the department of biochemistry, and Tina Leisner, PhD, a UNC research associate in biochemistry, about their research into the linkage between breast cancer and the protein CIB1.
Located in News / 2012 News
Understanding multiple causes of racial disparities in breast cancer is essential
Racial disparities in the treatment and outcome of breast cancer patients arise from a combination of biological, social and financial causes. Understanding how these complex factors influence interactions between patients and the medical community is key to reducing the gaps in treatment and mortality between racial groups, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina.
Located in News
Amos quoted in ABC News feature
Keith Amos, MD, assistant professor of surgery at UNC-Chapel Hill, is quoted in an ABC News feature discussing a new study about partial breast removal surgery to treat cancer.
Located in News / 2012 News
Melissa Troester
PhD, School of Public Health, UNC-Chapel Hill, Cancer Epidemiology, Breast Cancer
Located in People
David Ollila
MD, Surgery, UNC-Chapel Hill, Clinical Research, UNC Breast Center, Gastrointestinal Oncology Program, Melanoma Program
Located in People