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Inhibiting Macrophage MerTK Signaling Creates an Innate Immune Response Against Cancer
by Megan Fazekas-King (fazekask) published Jul 29, 2013 — filed under:
The tyrosine kinase MerTK plays a prominent role in the body’s immune response. MerTK signaling helps “calm” the body’s first line of immunity, the macrophage, while it performs the routine duties - clearing cells that die and healing damaged tissue.
Located in News
Inhibiting Macrophage MerTK Signaling Creates an Innate Immune Response Against Cancer
by Megan Fazekas-King (fazekask) published Jul 08, 2013 last modified Jul 08, 2013 01:01 PM — filed under:
The tyrosine kinase MerTK plays a prominent role in the body’s immune response. MerTK signaling helps “calm” the body’s first line of immunity, the macrophage, while it performs the routine duties - clearing cells that die and healing damaged tissue.
Located in Old top news stories
Kim named to Society of Surgical Oncology Executive Council
by William Shawn Davis (wishda) published Jun 14, 2013 last modified Jun 17, 2013 10:18 AM — filed under:
HJ Kim, MD, associate professor in UNC’s division of surgical oncology and endocrinology, has been named as a member of the Society of Surgical Oncology's (SSO) Executive Council.
Located in News
Komen awards more than $800,000 to UNC Lineberger researchers
by William Shawn Davis (wishda) published Aug 02, 2013 last modified Aug 02, 2013 12:59 PM — filed under:
Susan G. Komen for the Cure has awarded more than $800,000 to researchers with the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center to fund research into fighting cancer.
Located in News
NIH and UNC Researchers Define Role of Protein Vinculin in Cell Movement
by William Shawn Davis (wishda) published Aug 14, 2013 last modified Aug 14, 2013 09:53 AM — filed under:
Researchers at the University of North Carolina and the National Institutes for Health have defined the role of the protein vinculin in enabling cell movement. In a paper published in the Journal of Cell Biology, Sharon Campbell, PhD, professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics and member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Clare Waterman of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health showed that cell mobility occurs through the interactions between the protein vinculin and the cytoskeletal lattice formed by the protein actin. By physically binding to the actin that makes up the cytoskeleton, vinculin operates as a form of molecular clutch transferring force and controlling cell motion.
Located in News
Novel monoclonal antibody inhibits tumor growth in breast cancer and angiosarcoma
by William Davis published Apr 30, 2013 last modified May 08, 2013 02:09 PM — filed under:
A monoclonal antibody targeting a protein known as SFPR2 has been shown by researchers at the University of North Carolina to inhibit tumor growth in pre-clinical models of breast cancer and angiosarcoma.
Located in News
Rimer awarded American Cancer Society Medal of Honor
by William Shawn Davis (wishda) published May 23, 2013 last modified Sep 10, 2013 08:18 AM — filed under:
Barbara K. Rimer, DrPH, Dean and Alumni Distinguished Professor of the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, has been awarded the American Cancer Society (ACS) Medal of Honor for her "seminal cancer research efforts."
Located in News
Self-collection of samples for HPV testing shows promise in detection of cervical cancer in Kenya
by William Shawn Davis published May 08, 2013 last modified May 08, 2013 10:27 AM — filed under:
In Kenya, women face a cervical cancer mortality rate that is approximately 10 times as high as in the United States. A study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggests that training women to self-collect genital samples to test for human papillomavirus (HPV), the causative agent of cervical cancer, can increase the coverage rates of cervical cancer screening. Higher screening coverage helps increase rates of detection of cervical lesions and ultimately treatment of the disease.
Located in News
Smith - Worldwide cervical cancer prevention initiative announced at Women Deliver Conference in Malaysia
by William Shawn Davis (wishda) published May 28, 2013 last modified May 28, 2013 01:54 PM — filed under:
Cervical cancer kills an estimated 275,000 women each year, and most of these deaths could be prevented with prophylactic HPV vaccination, routine cervical cancer screening and continuity to treatment. At the Women Deliver Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, delegates and experts from around the world announced a global call to action to combat this preventable disease through collaboration with and information sharing by the world’s governments and health agencies on May 27, 2013.
Located in News
Smith interviewed by Agence France Presse on cervical cancer stigma in India
by William Shawn Davis published May 14, 2013 last modified May 14, 2013 11:24 AM — filed under:
Jennifer Smith, PhD, MPH, research associate professor at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, says that lack of awareness and stigma about the illness hinders prevention of the disease.
Located in News