Recent News

Low-risk prostate cancer best managed with active surveillance

Low-risk prostate cancer best managed with active surveillance

UNC Lineberger researcher Dr. Ronald C. Chen was first-author of a report published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology that details guidelines for the active surveillance of men with low-risk prostate cancer. The guidelines, originally authored by Cancer Care Ontario, were reviewed and endorsed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Low-risk prostate cancer best managed with active surveillance - Read More…

UNC experts talk ‘Cancer Moonshot’ with Vice President Biden

UNC experts talk ‘Cancer Moonshot’ with Vice President Biden

As part of the “Cancer Moonshot” federal initiative to spur breakthroughs in cancer research, Biden hosted a roundtable discussion on Wednesday at the Duke University School of Medicine that featured cancer experts and leaders from UNC. Among the experts chosen for the panel were Stephanie Wheeler, PhD, UNC Lineberger member and assistant professor of health policy and management at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and Niklaus Steiner, UNC-Chapel Hill professor and co-founder of the Chapel Hill-based Be Loud! Sophie Foundation, which supports adolescents and young adults with cancer.

UNC experts talk ‘Cancer Moonshot’ with Vice President Biden - Read More…

Advances in melanoma treatment focus of UNC conference

Advances in melanoma treatment focus of UNC conference

At the 10th Annual UNC Conference on Melanoma and Complex Skin Cancers: A Multidisciplinary Perspective, experts in melanoma treatment presented advances in treating the disease on Thursday. The conference, held at the William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education, drew dermatologists, surgeons, medical oncologists and other health care providers to hear presentations on topics ranging from immunotherapy drugs and targeted treatments for metastatic disease, radiation strategies, and chemotherapy to prevent skin cancer.

Advances in melanoma treatment focus of UNC conference - Read More…

Device hits pancreatic tumors hard with toxic four-drug cocktail, sparing the body

Device hits pancreatic tumors hard with toxic four-drug cocktail, sparing the body

A new implantable device delivers first-line treatment for pancreatic cancer directly to tumors, bypassing bloodstream and limiting widespread side effects. A team of researchers from the University of North Carolina including Drs. Jen Jen Yeh and Joseph DeSimone, has shown in preclinical research that the device can deliver a particularly toxic dose of drugs directly to pancreatic tumors to stunt their growth or, in some cases, shrink them. This approach would also spare the patient toxic side effects.

Device hits pancreatic tumors hard with toxic four-drug cocktail, sparing the body - Read More…